What is Testosterone 

Testosterone is a sex hormone that plays important roles in the body. In men, it’s thought to regulate sex drive (libido), bone mass, fat distribution, muscle mass and strength, and the production of red blood cells and sperm. A small amount of circulating testosterone is converted to estradiol, a form of estrogen. As men age, they often make less testosterone, and so they produce less estradiol as well. Thus, changes often attributed to testosterone deficiency might be partly or entirely due to the accompanying decline in estradiol.

Testosterone levels affect everything in men from the reproductive system and sexuality to muscle mass and bone density. It also plays a role in certain behaviors.

The body’s endocrine system consists of glands that manufacture hormones. The hypothalamus, located in the brain, tells the pituitary gland how much testosterone the body needs. The pituitary gland then sends the message to the testicles. Most testosterone is produced in the testicles, but small amounts come from the adrenal glands, which are located just above the kidneys. In women, the adrenal glands and ovaries produce small amounts of testosterone.

Before a boy is even born, testosterone is working to form male genitals. During puberty, testosterone is responsible for the development of male attributes like a deeper voice, beard, and body hair. It also promotes muscle mass and sex drive. Testosterone production surges during adolescence and peaks in the late teens or early 20s. After age 30, it’s natural for testosterone levels to drop by about one percent each year.

About seven weeks after conception, testosterone begins helping form male genitals. At puberty, as testosterone production surges, the testicles and penis grow. The testicles produce a steady stream of testosterone and make a fresh supply of sperm every day.

Men who have low levels of testosterone may experience erectile dysfunction (ED). Long-term testosterone therapy can cause a decrease in sperm production. Testosterone therapy also may cause enlarged prostate, and smaller, softer testicles. Men who have prostate or breast cancer should not consider testosterone replacement therapy.

During puberty, rising levels of testosterone encourage the growth of the testicles, penis, and pubic hair. The voice begins to deepen, and muscles and body hair grow. Along with these changes comes growing sexual desire.

There’s a bit of truth to the “use it or lose it” theory. A man with low levels of testosterone may lose his desire for sex. Sexual stimulation and sexual activity cause testosterone levels to rise. Testosterone levels can drop during a long period of sexual inactivity. Low testosterone can also result in erectile dysfunction (ED).

Testosterone is one of many factors involved in the development of muscle bulk and strength. Testosterone increases neurotransmitters, which encourage tissue growth. It also interacts with nuclear receptors in DNA, which causes protein synthesis. Testosterone increases levels of growth hormone. That makes exercise more likely to build muscle.

Testosterone increases bone density and tells the bone marrow to manufacture red blood cells. Men with very low levels of testosterone are more likely to suffer from bone fractures and breaks.

Testosterone also plays a role in fat metabolism, helping men to burn fat more efficiently. Dropping levels of testosterone can cause an increase in body fat.

Testosterone therapy can be administered by a doctor via intramuscular injections.

Since testosterone is such important element for the male make-up , it is very important that watch our levels and maintain a balance of testosterone.  It important in many aspects of health from our sexual reproduction , circulatory system to our bone and muscle building. 

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Kegel exercises 

Kegel Exercises: Treating Male Urinary Incontinence

Male urinary incontinence is both preventable and manageable. Kegel exercises can help you take control of your leaky bladder.

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If you practice Kegel exercises (also called pelvic floor exercises) for five minutes, two or three times daily, you will likely see significant improvement in your ability to control urinary leakage. Another bonus: Kegel exercises can also help you have more intense orgasms, and improve erections.

What Are Kegel Exercises for Men?

Kegels are exercises that help you zero in on and strengthen muscles below the bladder that help control urination.

In men, urinary incontinence can be caused by a weak urinary sphincter that may result from surgery for prostate cancer, an overactive bladder, or a bladder that doesn’t contract. Kegel exercises can help you improve — or in some cases completely regain — bladder control.

How Can Men Do Kegel Exercises?

Kegels are easy to do, once you know which muscles to target. One of the easiest ways to locate your muscles is during urination. Here’s how:

  • Halfway through urination, try to stop or slow down the flow of urine.
  • Don’t tense the muscles in your buttocks, legs, or abdomen, and don’t hold your breath.
  • When you can slow or stop the flow of urine, you’ve successfully located these muscles

Some men find these muscles by imagining that they are trying to stop the passage of gas. Squeezing these muscles gives a pulling sensation; these are the right muscles for pelvic exercises. It’s important not to contract other muscles.

Some men need biofeedback to help them target the right muscles.

To do Kegel exercises for men:

  • Contract these muscles for a slow count of five.
  • Release the muscles to a slow count of five.
  • Repeat 10 times.
  • Do a set of 10 Kegels daily, three times a day.

When you’re first starting, it may be easier to do Kegel exercises lying down, so your muscles aren’t fighting against gravity. It may also be easier to contract the muscles for just two or three seconds at first.

After a few weeks, increase the time until eventually you’re contracting the muscles for a slow five or 10 seconds, and do the exercises standing up. That puts more weight on the muscles, boosting your workout and improving your control.

Remember not to tense your buttock, legs, or stomach muscles while you’re doing Kegels.

When Will You See Results from Kegel Exercises?

Seeing results with any exercise takes time, so be patient. If you do Kegels three times a day, you should see better bladder control in three to six weeks — some men see it even sooner. Try keeping a record of your urine leakage each day to help you notice improvements.

If you don’t see any change in a month, you may not have located the right muscles for Kegel exercises. Give your doctor or urologist a call. They can offer tips on how to find and successfully exercise the right muscles.

3 Tips to Help Make Kegel Exercises a Habit

The most effective exercises are the ones you do regularly. To help you get into the rhythm of doing Kegels, try these simple tips:

  • Stay consistent. Do your Kegel exercises at the same time each day — maybe first thing in the morning while you are urinating, while brushing your teeth, and as you watch TV.
  • Remember the benefits. If you keep up with Kegels, they can really make a difference in your urinary incontinence.
  • Pay attention to progress. Over time, you’ll notice your urinary incontinence is improving. Maybe you’re having fewer leaks, or are leaking less.
Article provided by WebMD. Com